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Program for the Spring 2013 meeting

 

DATE AND PLACE
Saturday, April 20th
Santa Monica College

Science Building

Local Host: Nuria Rodriguez

CALL FOR PAPERS
The deadline for contributions has passed.

LUNCH INFO

Lunch will take place at local restaurants. 

See Maps and Schedule for more details.

MAPS AND DIRECTIONS
- Take the 10 Freeway West toward Santa Monica
- exit CLOVERFIELD and Turn LEFT.  Drive 1/2 mile to Pearl.
- Turn RIGHT on PEARL Street.
- just as you enter the campus, turn RIGHT into the Science parking Lot 1.
- Find the building that says SCIENCE and enter; the meeting is inside.

Campus map

PARKING
On Campus in Lot 1.  Parking is Free.

THANK YOU EXHIBITORS AND RAFFLE SPONSORS!

Cenco / Ward Science                 Arbor Scientific

THE WORLD FAMOUS "ORDER OF MAGNITUDE CONTEST" and Prizes!!!
Question:  "How many carbon atoms are tied up in all the diamond jewelry now possessed by all the people on earth?" - Bill Layton

Program Schedule

 

8:15

Registration and refreshments

8:30

Lab Tour of Santa Monica College

9:00

Welcome and Announcements

9:15

Contributed talk: Jacob Morris, Santa Monica College - Circuit Voltages and Magnetic Flux

A simple demonstration is presented that illustrates Faraday's Law and how magnetic flux can affect voltage measurements of circuit elements. 

9:30  

Contributed talk: Gary Reynolds, Santa Ana HS - Physics and the Next Generation Science Standards

 

Out with "No Child Left Behind"; In with "Common Core", the new "biggest thing" in K-12 education reform.   NGSS, Next Generation Science Standards, is the science component of Common Core.  I'll talk about what it is, and how it may affect physics education in high school and college.

9:45

Invited talk: James Bauer, JPL - Primitives Amongst Giants:  Anatomy of the Outer Solar System Small Bodies 

 

The minor planets and comets from beyond the asteroid Main Belt provide links with the Solar System's distant past. As bearers of volatiles they also play a current role in the evolution of the terrestrial planets. We will describe the relationships between the outer solar system small body populations, and some of the more recent findings concerning them. 

10:15

Invited talk: Amy Mainzer JPL - Asteroid Impacts: What We Know, and What's Left to Learn

 

Recent events in Chelyabinsk, Russia drive home the point that asteroids have impacted the Earth in the past and are certain to do so in the future.  What is the current state of our knowledge about these objects?   

10:45

Invited talk: Bonnie Buratti, JPL - Saturn's Moon Titan: An Earth in Deep Freeze

Recent results from the Cassini spacecraft show that many of the same erosional processes that are important on Earth also exist on Titan.

11:45

Business Meeting

12:00

Lunch – Off Campus 

1:15

Show and Tell

·         Hydrostatic Pressure in a Coiled Tube - Steve Paik, SMC

·         Chimney Updraft - Harry Manos, LACC

·         Egg into Milk Bottle in Slow Motion - Beth Stoeckly, CSUCI

·         The Aerodynamics of Cars - Dean Papadakis, South Pasadena High School

1:30

Contributed talk: Walter Gekelman, et al., UCLA - Using resonance cones to produce plasma jets

 

When a point source with an oscillating charge is placed in a magnetized plasma,the plasma responds by generating a large number of waves which interfere with one another. The interference pattern is a cone of electric field. The apex is centered on the point source and the cone axis is along the magnetic field. If RF is applied to a ring antenna each point on the ring produces a cone, and the cones form a focus far from the ring. The electric field at the focus can be very large. Resonance cones were generated in the LAPTAG plasma physics device at UCLA. Plasma density is measured with a Langmuir probe. A 2 GHz digital scope is used to record the data as the probe moves through the system. The electric field at the cone apex is large enough to accelerate plasma ions to supersonic velocities. Our goal is use two cones to force the accelerated ions to collide and generate a shock wave. The talk will emphasize the plasma physics as well as physical concepts the students are exposed to.

2:00

Contributed talk: James Lincoln, Tarbut V’Torah HS - 10 Demonstration Experiments with a Plasma Ball

 

Plasma balls can be one of the most important and versitile tools for teaching the concepts in static electricity.  In this talk, I provide 10 surprising and exciting additions to the typical demonstrations that are done with the plasma ball.

2:15

Invited talk: Erick Wolf, airwolf3d.com -  3D Printers: How they work, Why your classroom needs one, and How you can afford it

 

Southern California-based Airwolf 3D Printers offers 3D printers of exceptional performance, engineered from the bottom up for ease of use and dependability. Using constantly updated open source software, the AW3D V.5 stays abreast of current technology and provides a solid foundation for your journey into the world of 3D printing.  Find out  how 3D Printers work and what they can be used for. 

3:15

Contributed talk: Martin Simon, UCLA -  Can Cell Phones Cause Cancer?

 

There have been claims that microwave radiation from cell phones and other sources and even 60 Hz power lines and computers can cause cancer.  Physics puts severe constraints on various theories of how this could work.  This talk is a brief review of EM interaction with matter, relevant thermodynamics, and resonance.  Together they rule out some of the proposed mechanisms, such as calcium ion cyclotron resonances in the earth's magnetic field.

3:45

Contributed talk: Bernard Cleyet, UCSC (retired), Is Popping Corn Kernels an Example of the Poisson Distribution?

 

I'll describe my attempt to show this along with a similar analysis of Geiger tube pulses. 

4:00

Order of Magnitude contest and door prizes

4:15

Adjournment

 

 

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